Microsoft excel 2016 all in one for dummies 無料ダウンロード.Office 2016 All In One For Dummies Pdf

 

Microsoft excel 2016 all in one for dummies 無料ダウンロード.Excel 2016 All-in-One For Dummies

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Excel All In One For Dummies. Download Excel All In One For Dummies PDF/ePub or read online books in Mobi eBooks. Click Download or Read Online button to get Excel All In One For Dummies book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want From word processing to business communication to data crunching, it requires a lot of knowledge to operate it-let alone master it. Luckily, Office All-in-One For Dummies is here to deliver the breadth of information you need to complete basic tasks and drill down into Office’s advanced features Excel All-in-One For Dummies () Book VIII Macros and VBA Chapter 2 VBA Programming. In This Chapter. Getting familiar with Visual Basic for Applications and the Visual Basic Editor. Editing a macro in the Visual Basic Editor. Creating a dialog box that prompts you for input for your macro. Writing new macros in the Visual Basic Editor
 
 

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Getting familiar with Visual Basic for Applications and the Visual Basic Editor. Editing a macro in the Visual Basic Editor. Creating a dialog box that prompts you for input for your macro. Writing new macros in the Visual Basic Editor. Using VBA to create user-defined functions. Using your user-defined functions in your spreadsheets. Saving user-defined functions as Excel add-ins.

The subject of this chapter is Visual Basic for Applications usually known simply as VBA , which is the official programming language of Excel, and how you can use it to edit the macros that you record as described in Book VIII, Chapter 1 as well as to write new macros.

The key to editing and writing macros in VBA is its editing program, the Visual Basic Editor often abbreviated as VBE. The Visual Basic Editor offers a rich environment for coding and debugging VBA code with an interface that rivals Excel itself in terms of features and complexity. VBA is a huge subject, well beyond the scope of this book. In this chapter, I simply introduce you to the Visual Basic Editor, and I explain how to use it to do basic macro editing.

I also show you how to use the Visual Basic Editor to create custom Excel functions that you can then use when building formulas in your Excel spreadsheets. Custom functions also known as user-defined functions or UDFs work just like built-in functions except that they perform only the calculations that you define, by using just the arguments that you specify.

If this basic introduction to Visual Basic for Applications and using the Visual Basic Editor inspires you to go on and try your hand at real VBA project development in Excel, I recommend VBA For Dummies, 5th Edition by John Paul Mueller as an excellent next step.

The Developer tab is not one of the permanent tabs on the Excel Ribbon. Figure shows the arrangement of the typical components in the Visual Basic Editor after you first open its window and open a new module sheet. As you can see, this window contains its own menu bar with a few more menus than the regular Excel window uses.

Beneath the menu bar, you find a Visual Basic Editor Standard toolbar. This toolbar, shown in Figure , contains a number of buttons that you may use when creating and editing VBA code.

Figure The Visual Basic Editor window as it normally appears when editing a macro. Beneath the Standard toolbar in the Visual Basic Editor, you find a number of tiled windows of various sizes and shapes. Keep in mind that these are the default windows.

The Project Explorer window, which is located to the immediate left of the Code window refer to Figure , shows you all the projects that you have open in the Visual Basic Editor and enables you to easily navigate their various parts.

Note that in VBA, a project consists of all the code and user forms that belong to a particular workbook along with the sheets of the workbook itself.

The macros that you record in the workbook, as well as any that you write for it in the Visual Basic Editor, are recorded on module sheets to which generic names are assigned, such as Module1, Module2, and so forth.

The actual lines of VBA programming code for the macro that are stored on a particular module sheet appear in the Code window when you select its module in the Project Explorer window. The Code window appears to the immediate right of the Project Explorer window.

To open a module in the Code window, double-click its module icon in the Project Explorer or right-click the module icon and then choose View Code at the top of its shortcut menu.

If you want to rename a module in your VBA project to something a little more descriptive than Module1, Module2, and so on, you can do this in the Properties window that appears immediately below the Project Explorer. Simply click and drag through the name such as Module1 or Module2 that appears after the label Name on the Alphabetic tab in the Properties window and replace it with a more descriptive name before you press Enter. Use underlines instead.

In many cases, you will find it more expedient to change its behavior by simply editing its contents in the Visual Basic Editor. Note that if the macro you want to edit is stored in your Personal Macro Workbook that personal. xlsb file in the XLSTART folder — see Book VIII, Chapter 1 for details , you must unhide this workbook before you edit it in the Visual Basic Editor. Excel opens the Unhide dialog box showing the workbook, PERSONAL. XLSB, in its Unhide Workbook list box. Click PERSONAL.

XLSB in the Unhide Workbook list box and then press Enter. This action makes the Personal Macro Workbook visible and activates it so that you can now edit its macros in the Visual Basic Editor. Click the name of the macro that you want to edit in the Macro Name list box and then click the Edit button.

This action opens the Visual Basic Editor with the code for your macro displayed in the Code window unless you select the name of a macro saved in the Personal Macro Workbook and this workbook is still hidden. You then need to click OK in the Alert dialog box, press Escape to close the Macro dialog box, and then follow the steps for unhiding the Personal Macro Workbook immediately preceding these steps before you repeat these first two macro editing steps. After you have the lines of code for the macro displayed in the Code window in the Visual Basic Editor, you can edit any of its statements as needed.

This action opens a Print – VBAProject dialog box with the Current Module option button selected in the Range section and the Code check box selected in the Print What section so that you can go ahead and click OK to have Excel print all the statements in the macro. Edit the statements in the Code window of the Visual Basic Editor as needed.

If everything checks out and runs as planned, you need to save your changes as outlined in Step 5. If you modified a global macro saved as part of the Personal Macro Workbook, you have to exit Excel in order to save your changes to the macro. xlsb file. Click the Yes button to save your macro modifications as you close down Excel. XLSB workbook is active sometime before exiting the program. You can use the Find feature in the Visual Basic Editor to quickly locate the statements or properties that need editing in your macro.

This dialog box is very similar to the one you use when finding entries in your Excel spreadsheet. The main difference is that the Find dialog box gives you different choices for what to search for in addition to the familiar options for finding whole words only and matching case :. Figure Using the Find feature to locate the code to edit in the Code window.

After you enter the Visual Basic property or statement as your search string in the Find What text box, select the search options, and click the Find Next button, Excel attempts to locate its first occurrence in the code.

When it does, the program highlights that occurrence in the current procedure, module, VBA project, or selected text block depending on which Search option you use.

To find the next occurrence, you can click the Find Next button in the Find dialog box again or, if you close this dialog box, press F3. If you have a number of occurrences throughout the macro that require the same type of updating, you can use the Replace feature to both find and replace them in the macro code. Note that you can open the Replace dialog box from within the Find dialog box by clicking its Replace button.

The Replace dialog box that appears is just like the Find dialog box, except that it contains a Replace With text box along with the Find What text box and has Replace and Replace All buttons in addition to the Find Next button.

After entering the property or statement to find in the Find What text box and the one to replace it with in the Replace With text box, click the Find Next button to locate the first occurrence in the current procedure, module, VBA project, or selected text block depending on which Search option you use.

After this occurrence is selected in the Code window, you have it replaced with the replacement text by clicking the Replace button. Excel then locates the next occurrence, which you can then replace by clicking the Replace button or pass over to find the next occurrence by clicking the Find Next button.

I then clicked the Replace All button only to discover to my dismay that I introduced this error throughout the code!

Going a step further, you probably can figure out that most of these attributes are being reset by making the attribute equal to a new entry or value, such as. or an attribute is being reset by turning it on or off by setting it equal to True or False, such as. For example, suppose that you want the final font size to be 24 points instead of All you have to do is change. One of the biggest problems with recording macros is that any text or values that you have the macro enter for you in a worksheet or chart sheet can never vary thereafter.

However, you can get around this inflexibility by using the InputBox function. When you run the macro, this Visual Basic function causes Excel to display an Input dialog box where you can enter whatever title makes sense for the new worksheet. The InputBox function uses the following syntax:. In this function, only the prompt argument is required with the rest of the arguments being optional.

The prompt argument specifies the message that appears inside the Input dialog box, prompting the user to enter a new value or in this case, a new company name. The prompt argument can be up to a maximum of 1, characters.

If you want the prompt message to appear on different lines inside the dialog box, you enter the functions Chr 13 and Chr 10 in the text to insert a carriage return and a linefeed in the message, respectively. The optional title argument specifies what text to display in the title bar of the Input dialog box. The optional default argument specifies the default response that automatically appears in the text box at the bottom of the Input dialog box.

The xpos and ypos optional arguments specify the horizontal distance from the left edge of the screen to the left edge of the dialog box and the vertical distance from the top edge of the screen to the top edge of the dialog box.

The helpfile and context optional arguments specify the name of the custom Help file that you make available to the user to explain the workings of the Input dialog box as well as the type of data that it accepts. As part of the process of creating a custom help file for use in the Excel Help system, you assign the topic a context number appropriate to its content, which is then specified as the context argument for the InputBox function.

When you specify a help file and context argument for this function, Excel adds a Help button to the custom Input dialog box that users can click to access the custom help file in the Help window. Before you can add the line of code to the macro with the InputBox function, you need to find the place in the Visual Basic commands where the line should go. To add interactivity to the macro, you need to insert the InputBox function on a line in the Code window right above this ActiveCell.

FormulaR1C1 statement, as follows:. Position the insertion point in the Code window at the beginning of the ActiveCell. FormulaR1C1 statement and press Enter to insert a new line. On this line, you want to create a variable that supplies the prompt argument to the InputBox function. To do this, you state the name of the variable InputMsg in this case followed by its current entry. Be sure to enclose the message text on the right side of the equal sign in a closed pair of double quotation marks.

Type the following code to create the InputMsg variable on line 9 and then press the Enter key to start a new line Next, you create a variable named InputTitle that supplies the optional title argument for the InputBox function. Again, be sure to enclose the name for the dialog box title bar in quotation marks. Type the following code to create the InputTitle variable on line 10 and then press Enter to insert a new line Next, you create a variable name DefaultText that supplied the optional default argument to the InputBox function.

Type the following code to create the DefaultText variable on line 11 and then press Enter to insert a new line Next, you create a final variable named CompanyName that specifies the InputBox function as its entry using the InputMsg, InputTitle, and DefaultText variables that you just created and stores the results of this function.

Type the following code to create the SpreadsheetTitle variable that uses the InputBox function on line